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Rollga Foam Roller Review: What To Expect

Rolla TFL Stretch

 

So you’re thinking about buying the Rollga but don’t know if it's suitable for you. 


An interesting caterpillar-type design but how is that better than a regular foam roller. Well, there are benefits to both, and depending on what your pain relief/fitness goals are, you should get a product that puts your health first. 


As an athlete who has tried a variety of pain relief products, I will be walking you through my experience with the Rollage and determining if it’s right for you.

 

Pre-Purchase Thought Process

Before purchasing Rollga my expectations weren’t too high.


When looking at the product, I struggled to understand why its shape was curved. 


I expected the Rollga to be a good mid-back and spine stretcher but that was about it.

 

Getting the Rollga:

I was surprised at how light the product was. I was convinced the box the Rollga arrived in was empty it was that light.

The box provides a pamphlet that shows you how to use the Rollga. It walks you through stretches and exercises. 

[1] The pamphlet also provides a reference to “multifunctional zones” where each curve on the tool should be placed on the body, which I found helpful.

The Rollga also comes with an over-the-shoulder strap that makes the product easy to transport.


What does the Rollga do?

Rollaga was designed to outcompete the regular foam roller in the way that Rollga allows you to go deeper into certain parts of the body.

The standard foam roller was designed to reduce muscle soreness while the Rollga was created more for increasing muscle flexibility.


Main Muscles:

Mid-Upper Back
Foam Roll Upper Back - Rollga
Glutes
Rollga - Glutes
Tensor Fasciae Latae (TFL)/Hip Flexors
Foam Roll TFL - Rollga
Hamstrings
Hamstring Foam Roll - Rollga

 

What I got out of the Rollga

The Rollga was great for stretching the mid-upper back and targeting the muscles surrounding your spine such as the rhomboids, latissimus dorsi, and longissimus.

The curve designed for the TFL was awesome, the ridge fits right in the pocket of the hip flexor. If I ever find myself with a sore or tight TFL muscle I will be sure to grab my Rollga for relief.

As for the hip muscles such as the gluteus medius and piriformis, I found the cheaper foam material was too cushiony and didn’t get as deep as I had hoped. If you’ve rolled out your hips with a lacrosse ball before, you understand what a proper release should feel like. The Rollga was not as intense as I would have liked.

Hamstrings and calves were a bonus that the Rollga provided. As someone who does roll either of these muscles out too often, I found the Rollga targeted them both surprisingly well.

Foam rolling for lower back relief was also difficult. Lower back pain-inducing muscles such as the quadratus lumborum require a deeper and more targeted release that the Rollga couldn’t offer. The release of deep spine surrounding muscles requires a pointy knuckle or elbow to effectively release a trigger point.

Lower Back Trigger Points

When it came to rolling out my quadriceps, I discovered that, except from the vastus medialis or tear drop region, getting comfortable relief was difficult. The quadriceps are made up of four muscles that span the front and sides of the femur. However, due to the Rollga's curved form, I had difficulties rolling the other three sections of my quad. While it was comfortable, I discovered that I preferred to use a traditional foam roller for this specific area of my body.


Rollga Pain Relief

If your fitness goals are to relieve soreness and alleviate surface-level muscle tightness, the Rollga sounds perfect for you. Especially if you’re looking to target the hamstrings, calves, TFL/hip flexor, and the muscles in my mid-upper back.

Rollga Pain Relief

However, If you’re purchasing the Rollga to find pain relief and alleviate deep muscle tension and tightness I would look at alternative and more study products. 

Two tools that are great for releasing your hips if you suffer from glute pain include the QL Claw vs Hip Hook. Both these tools are equipped with a knuckle designed to release muscle knots that reside deep within muscles.

    

Would I recommend the Rollga to a friend?

My recommendation would depend on my friend's lifestyle and intentions with the tool. But, if my friend was an active person, perhaps an athlete, yes I would recommend the Rollga.

What’s special about the Rollga is the variety of functions and muscle-targeting features it has. While I did not benefit from the lower back or glute side of the tool, somebody else might. I still found value in rolling my TFL muscle and upper back out. There’s a function out there for everyone.

If you decide to purchase the Rollga, don’t quit on it after only one or two uses. The curved design takes a couple of sessions to get a proper feel for the tool. You cannot treat the Rollga like a standard foam roller because it is not designed to be used like that. Follow the guide and allow yourself to receive the benefits the tool has to offer.

  

Rollga FAQ:

Is the Rollga better than a regular foam roller?

Both rollers have their own set of benefits. The standard foam roller was designed to reduce muscle soreness while the Rollga was created more for increasing muscle flexibility.

Can you use the Rollga on your back?

Yes, the Rollga was designed to target surrounding spinal muscles. 

What’s a good alternative to the the Rollga?

Your standard foam roller is the most obvious alternative. If you are looking to target your quadriceps, a massage/roller stick is a good option. For lower back pain relief and trigger point therapy, the QL Claw is a great alternative. For hip relief, a lacrosse ball or the hip hook are both great options. When looking for the right tool, it’s best to identify your fitness goals and what you hope to achieve before making an impulsive purchase.

How did I benefit from the Rollga?

There was a lot of information on the muscles the Rollga was designed to target, but the main muscles I felt a genuinely beneficial massage in were the hamstrings, calves, TFL/hip flexor, and the muscles in my mid-upper back.

  

 

Sources:

[1] https://rollga.com/blogs/news/nurturing-body-and-mind-a-fitness-guide

 

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